Influencers allow tens of thousands of people to look into their homes: ‘I got a little out of control’ | living

Influencers allow tens of thousands of people to look into their homes: 'I got a little out of control' |  living

For some interior designers, their home is their shop window. They share photos and videos of their decorative living rooms and bedrooms on social media. What does it look like to put something as personal as your home on the World Wide Web? Three designers scale down Influencers say.

Wendy Koning (51 years old), 88K followers

Photo from a private archive. © Wendy Koning

“Strange that a simple video of my garden has been viewed a million times. I’m too lazy to spend a lot of time on it: I have 2,000 unfinished drafts. Sharing on Instagram is part of me. If I don’t post anything for a day and a half, I have so much fun and want Share it.I drag my stuff back and forth like some kind of hamster in the house.My big love is long black in the open air.It all comes together on my Instagram.

I want to show that you can be happy at home with what you have. I also share funny and well-known stories. Recently, a teenage son asked “what are all those deer plants doing here” after I bought all the new ones. Followers find this very funny. Sometimes I wonder where the limits are for me in sharing online. In my early years as an interior designer, I consciously kept my home hidden because I didn’t want to impress my clients. At one point, I thought it would be fun to show, and it just got a little out of hand.

I no longer share my home front on Instagram. When I walk to the mailbox with my fluffy haircut, I don’t want people to know me. When I shared the front cover, people who knew me from Instagram were coming over regularly. You don’t have to, that’s what my friends strive for. I am sometimes recognized in the local jumbo. Then people start talking about something and I think: Huh, how do you know that? And then the penny drops: Oh, yeah, Instagram.”

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The video below has been viewed a million times.



Irene Merman (46), 7,500 followers: I don’t want to share the joys and sorrows on Instagram

Photo from a private archive.
Photo from a private archive. © Erin Merman

“I jokingly went to share some of my inner photos on Instagram when I was still working as an HR. I got so many responses that I quickly tried to get it. I reached out to the big brands for collaboration but was told I had no experience .

I’m still trying: you get a hundred times no, but that yes makes you more. I am now an ambassador for brands like Wehkamp and Pip Studio. I built my network through Instagram. You’re following a master class here, an internship there and before you know it, you’re in an online community with all kinds of professionals. She has brought me many clients, both for collaboration and in my first job as an in-house consultant.



I like to show on Instagram what you can do in the area of ​​sustainability and creativity. It’s the most personal thing I do at work for me. I don’t like to share the joys and sorrows on Instagram, even if I learned in courses that it gives you more followers. I was recently contacted for a TV commercial for my home show but that’s too far for me. As long as I post myself, I control what I post.

The interior design reflects who I am. I’m basically quiet, but if you know me you know I’m also a crazy thing. You can see it in me: I like calming natural colors, but with quirks like a fake robin on the wall or three vases painted on top of each other. I think it’s important to be different, it makes the house so special and intimidating.”


Sanne de Koning (29) and Leroy Tirion (31), 84,000 followers: “People say our house is like a showroom”

Photo from a private archive.
Photo from a private archive. © Sanne de Koning

“Our home is an online platform for inspiration. We have our own web store where we sell furniture and accessories that are in our home. A big part of the interior changes every week. People love seeing items in the home environment so they know what it’s like to be in their home. We feel at home because of the tones The material is warm.

See at vtwon how you can make interior lighting warmer in an instant.

People say our house looks like a showroom, but when we get home, it’s just a mess. It is not fixed as in the pictures. Initially, the purpose of the Instagram account was to record our renewal in some kind of visual diary. Then we started sharing more and more atmospheric photos, but at one point we realized: This is really just promoting other people’s stuff.


During a dinner with Leroy’s sister, we chatted about her recently closed indoor shop. I have known many suppliers and have come up with an idea that allows us to work with them. If people want to buy something, we meet them at a place where the items are or provide an address where you can view samples. Our home is just a platform for online inspiration: we don’t want customers any more.

“We design based on the feel and a little hands-on experience from Leroy’s sister. We do the interior design, but our focus is on the online store. We initially wanted to do a pattern course, but the business was going so well that we didn’t have time for it. “.


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