How much of each hard-earned euro goes to the tax authority? – Will

How much of each hard-earned euro goes to the tax authority?  - Will

Our southern neighbors are not only famous for their beer and chocolate, but also for their exorbitant wage tax of 45.2 percent last year. In any of the 38 OECD countries, workers don’t have to pay that much money. Then we have nothing to complain about in Holland.

This concerns not only income tax, but also all premiums for the employer and employees. After Belgium, Germany, France and Italy, they all carry a tax burden of 40.9 percent.

We find only the Netherlands in 26th place with an average tax rate of 27.4 per cent, around the OECD average of 28.8 per cent. This puts us well ahead of the UK, where 27.2 per cent are paid. Again, we seem to have more in common with our Anglo-Saxon neighbor abroad than with the social democratic nations around us with which we can compare them.

This is the full list of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that publishes this public view annually:

  1. Belgium – 45.2 per cent
  2. Germany – 40.9 percent
  3. France – 40.9 percent
  4. Italy – 40.9 percent
  5. Sweden – 38.5 per cent
  6. Austria – 38.4 percent
  7. Turkey – 37.9 percent
  8. Finland – 37.6 percent
  9. Portugal – 37.2 percent
  10. Slovenia – 36.4 percent
  11. Spain – 36.2 percent
  12. Slovakia
  13. Hungary
  14. Latvia
  15. Greece
  16. Norway
  17. Estonia
  18. Latvia
  19. Denmark
  20. Czech Republic
  21. Iceland
  22. Japan
  23. Luxembourg
  24. Costa Rica
  25. Canada
  26. Netherlands – 27.4 per cent
  27. United kingdom
  28. Ireland
  29. Australia
  30. Poland
  31. South Korea
  32. Mexico
  33. Israel
  34. United States – 17.9 percent
  35. New Zealand
  36. Switzerland – 16.8 percent
  37. Colombia
  38. Chili pepper
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sources): HLN

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