Nushell 0.60: Command line structuring for Linux, Windows, and macOS

Nushell 0.60: Command line structuring for Linux, Windows, and macOS

There is a big update for Nushell with the new version 0.60. The project, also called Nu, aims to combine the best functionality from classic shells like Bash, object-based shells like PowerShell, and concepts from software development. Rather than presenting the user with a pure text stream, Nushell wants to set up the retrieved data in an organized way.

The most important change in the new version is the individually configurable autocomplete. Users can now write scripts in which they specify which parameters – options and arguments – belong to any command. External commands can also be specified, including correcting typos and highlighting syntax.

There is also a new configuration file for Nushell: the configuration file generated by a Nushell script replaces the old .toml version. On first startup, the program asks the user to create a new configuration. Standard values ​​\u200b\u200bcan be modified directly here, suitable examples for the latter will help here.

Nushell’s notable function is to output data into tables – with one ls The user sees, for example, all files in the directory prepared clearly. With version 0.60, tables can now be provided with a footer containing column labels for the various information of a command.

Users also get new commands: Run !! Calls the last command again, a ! Including the date line number any of history. about ls Now there is a more compact output for each grid. In addition, the internal Reedline is now used as a line editor, which can be used to search for auto-completions and commands from history in menus, among other things.

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In addition, there are many changes to the Nu language itself, plus Nushell will receive a new engine called engine-q – technical details can be found on the project page. The overall instructions for the new version 0.60 have also been modified. The software is an open source project under the MIT license and available for Windows, macOS, and Linux distributions.

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