Legendary shipwreck fails excavation in 1915 near Antarctica | to know

Legendary shipwreck fails excavation in 1915 near Antarctica |  to know

VideoResearchers have discovered the wreck of a ship that sank more than a century ago off the coast of Antarctica. It’s about the endurance of British explorer Ernest Shackleton, whose failed expedition was world-renowned because all 28 on board survived.


Caspar Naber


Last updated:
09-03-22, 13:42

One of the world’s most legendary shipwrecks has been discovered off the coast of Antarctica more than a century after it sank, members of Expedition Endurance22 announced Wednesday. The ship that was found sank in 1915 after being slowly compressed by an ice pack and was never seen again. Previous searches for the shipwreck yielded nothing. For the expedition, which began last month, an area in the Weddell Sea was identified as a research site before departure. The ship was found there at a depth of 3,008 meters.

The released photos, taken by a small remote-controlled submarine, show that the wreck is still in good condition. It is protected as a historic site and monument by the Antarctic Treaty. This means that debris should not be touched or disturbed when examining or taking pictures.

A milestone in polar history

Research leader Minson Pound, a British marine biologist, talks about a unique and historic discovery. “We were lucky to locate the ship and take pictures of the Durability. This is by far the most beautiful wooden shipwreck I have ever seen. It stands upright and proud of the seabed, almost intact, and in great protection. You can even see the name of the Durability bent to the stern. “This is a milestone in polar history,” he said in a press release.

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The goal of the Endurance22 flight was to locate, survey and photograph the wreck, as well as to conduct important scientific research and provide an exceptional experience. communicationProgram (helping the underprivileged). Today’s celebrations are overshadowed by global events, and everyone involved in Endurance22 keeps those affected by these ongoing horrific events in mind and prays their prayers.

“We hope our discovery will attract and inspire the pioneering spirit, courage and determination of those who have sailed with endurance to Antarctica. We commend the navigational skills of Captain Frank Worsley, whose detailed records have been invaluable in our search for the wreck. About four miles (about 7.4) were found. kilometers) south of the site in the search area calculated by the captain before leaving Cape Town.

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According to the study leader, the stamina wreck “stands upright and proud on the sea floor, almost intact, and in wonderful preservation” despite being slowly compressed by the ice pack. © Falkland Maritime Heritage Trust/National Geographic

The study leader, who was born in the Falkland Islands, about 5,000 kilometers north of Antarctica, also thanked all the participants. This success is the result of an impressive collaboration between many people, both on board the SA Agulhas II (South African Icebreaking Attaché Research Ship, ed.) with its excellent captain and crew, a skilled and dedicated expedition team, many of whom are support we can count on in the UK South Africa, Germany, France, the United States, and elsewhere.”

He also thanked his colleagues at the Falklands Maritime Heritage Trust for making the “extraordinary expedition” possible, as well as Saab for its technology and the team of experts involved “in this huge discovery,” according to Manson Pound.

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Crossing on foot

Shackleton was the first to cross Antarctica on foot, but his ship never made landfall. It got stuck in the ice in January 1915. Those on board remained on board, but decided to leave the ship in October because it had crashed. Using lifeboats they managed to reach the uninhabited Elephant Island. Shackleton and five others then made the trip in a boat to South Georgia, where they could seek help for those left behind.

Falkland Islands Maritime Heritage Trust / National Geographic
© Falkland Maritime Heritage Trust/National Geographic

Falkland Islands Maritime Heritage Trust / National Geographic
© Falkland Maritime Heritage Trust/National Geographic

Images of the Ernest Shackleton Endurance wreck, created by a small remote-controlled submarine, can be seen on screens in the control room of the SA Agulhas II expedition cruise ship.
Images of the Ernest Shackleton Endurance wreck, created by a small remote-controlled submarine, can be seen on screens in the control room of the SA Agulhas II expedition cruise ship. © AFP

France Press agency
© AFP

France Press agency
© AFP

France Press agency
© AFP

France Press agency
© AFP

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