Jack Sherman dead: Red Hot Chili Peppers’ guitarist dies aged 64

Jack Sherman has died at the age of 64.

The talented guitarist, who found fame as part of Red Hot Chili Peppers, passed away of unknown causes.

In a tribute post confirming his sad death, the band hailed him as “unique”.

“We of the RHCP family would like to wish Jack Sherman smooth sailing into the worlds beyond, for he has passed,” they said in an Onstagram statement.

“Jack played on our debut album as well as our first tour of the USA. He was a unique dude and we thank him for all times good, bad and in between. Peace on the boogie platform.”

Jack Sherman has been hailed as ‘unique’ by RHCP

Jack is believed to have died on August 18, but the news wasn’t made public until Friday night.

The musician had joined the band in time for their debut album in 1983, replacing on/off guitarist Hillel Slovak.

Jack then co-wrote a large proportion of their second studio offering Freaky Styley in 1985 but was replaced in turn by Hillel by the time the album came out.

He still made further appearances on their later work, including Mother’s Milk and The Abbey Road EP.

Jack wasn’t included in the band’s induction to the Rock & Rall Hall Of Fame in 2012 – a decision that left him bitterly disappointed.

Jack pictured in 1998

“I’m being dishonoured, and it sucks,” he told Billboard that year.

“It’s really painful to see all this celebrating going on and be excluded. I’m not claiming that I’ve brought anything other to the band… but to have soldiered on under arduous conditions to try to make the thing work, and I think that’s what you do in a job, looking back. And that’s been dishonored.”

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Controversially, Dave Navarro was also left out of the honours.

As well as his work with Chili Peppers, Jack took the lead guitar role on Tonio K’s Notes From The Lost Civilization album and Bob Dylan’s Knocked Out Loaded.

He found himself in high demand after leaving RHCP and worked as a session player during the rest of the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Rest in peace, Jack.

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