From “Can a woman do that?” As a judge, he defended the women

From "Can a woman do that?"  As a judge, he defended the women

Only after a long search did Ruth Bader Ginsburg find her place after law school as a judge’s assistant. No, as would be expected for a senior student at two major universities, Harvard and Columbia, for a member of the Supreme Court. There it was rejected. The average judge was willing to stand trial with her, on the condition that the teacher who convinced him was around another student. In the event that the job turns out to be very difficult for her.

It was 1960. In 1993, Bader Ginsburg herself became a member of the Supreme Court, as the second-ever woman. She did this almost until her death, Friday, at the age of 87. This week, President Donald Trump will nominate her successor. He promised, without doubt, in light of the upcoming elections, that she would be a woman.

Jewish, wife and mother

Badr Ginsburg himself contributed a lot to this massive change in the status of women in the United States, and not just as a judge. But it wasn’t like that at first. After her help, she applied in vain to the law firms. She said, “I had three things.” “I was a Jew, a wife and a mother.”

Instead, she taught law at Rutgers University. There, she campaigned with her female colleagues for equal pay with men. In 1972 she transferred to Columbia University. Nonetheless, she appeared in court: She defended ACLU in the Supreme Court in six lawsuits regarding discrimination against women, of which she won five.

But one of her most famous cases was before the Denver Court of Appeals, where her client was a man. He was not allowed to deduct his mother’s nursing costs from taxes; If it were a woman he would have been fine. The court ruled that this distinction was unconstitutional.

Negative vote tips for Trump

Ginsburg’s career up to that victory was filmed in 2018. On the basis of gender didn’t make her famous, it really was. Her fight for women’s rights as a member of the Supreme Court, and the openness with which she spoke of her progressive positions – including the negative vote for Trump in 2016 – gave her an opportunity to judge extraordinary popularity. The slender head, crowned with one of the distinctive collars that she wore on the toga underneath, appeared as an icon on the shirts, earning the honorary title “The Notorious RBG” from the rapper’s name.

Supreme Court members are nominated for life, and Bader Ginsburg will not stop. Her aging and declining health has made Democrats increasingly concerned about the possibility that President Trump will name her replacement and be elected president of the court for a third time. The satirical show Saturday Night Live, played by Kate McKinnon, left her to stick to an agenda containing only one agreement: “Don’t Die.”

She herself was worried, too. “I very much hope that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed,” she said before her death. If it were up to Donald Trump and the Republicans, this wish would not be fulfilled.

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