The great ivory-billed woodpecker and 22 other species declared extinct in the United States – Nature – Travel

The great ivory-billed woodpecker and 22 other species declared extinct in the United States - Nature - Travel

It concerns 11 species of birds, 2 species of fish, 1 species of bats, 8 freshwater mussels and 1 plant species. The purpose of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) was to protect endangered species and their habitats. Unfortunately, protection came too late for these 23 species. By 1973 they were so rare that they were feared to disappear. The European Space Agency was unable to prevent its extinction.

The two most important animals that have disappeared are the great ivory-billed woodpecker and Bachmann’s bird. The great ivory-billed woodpecker was the largest woodpecker in the United States and was last seen in Louisiana in 1944. The beautiful bird has been searched for decades, to no avail. The reason for its extinction is the disappearance of ancient forests and because the bird was captured by collectors. Backman’s singer disappeared for the same reasons. The black and yellow bird was actually one of the rarest songbirds in the United States in 1953. It was last seen in the United States in 1962 and last seen in Cuba in 1981.

Bachmans zanger © Getty Images

It is noteworthy that 11 of the 23 extinct species lived in the islands of Hawaii, Guam and other American islands in the Pacific Ocean. The species found on these islands are particularly threatened due to their isolated location and small area. The plant and animal world is also very rich. 650 species of these islands are present in the European Space Agency. A large part of it is found only on those islands and nowhere else in the world.

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Since 1970, about three billion birds have disappeared from the United States as a result of “human-induced changes to their habitats,” Bridget Fay of the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) told the New York Times.

However, the ESA is certainly not useless because many successes have been achieved in recent years. For example, 54 species that were originally on the list can be removed because they are now working fine again. This applies, for example, to the bald eagle, brown pelican and humpback whale. The status of 56 species was downgraded from “critically endangered” to “endangered”. In addition, FWS has worked with local governments, indigenous tribes, and private landowners to remove 60 species from the list.

It concerns 11 species of birds, 2 species of fish, 1 species of bats, 8 freshwater mussels and 1 plant species. The purpose of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) was to protect endangered species and their habitats. Unfortunately, protection came too late for these 23 species. By 1973 they were so rare that they were feared to disappear. The European Space Agency was unable to prevent its extinction. The two most important animals that have disappeared are the great ivory-billed woodpecker and Bachmann’s bird. The great ivory-billed woodpecker was the largest woodpecker in the United States and was last seen in Louisiana in 1944. The beautiful bird has been searched for decades, to no avail. The reason for its extinction is the disappearance of ancient forests and because the bird was captured by collectors. Backman’s singer disappeared for the same reasons. The black and yellow bird was already one of the rarest songbirds in the United States in 1953. It was last seen in the United States in 1962 and last seen in Cuba in 1981. It is noteworthy that 11 of the 23 extinct species lived on the islands of Hawaii, Guam and other American islands in The Pacific Ocean. The species found on these islands are particularly threatened due to their isolated location and small area. The plant and animal world is also very rich. 650 species of these islands are present in the European Space Agency. Much of it is only found on those islands and nowhere else in the world. About three billion birds have disappeared from the United States since 1970, as a result of “human-caused changes to their habitats,” Bridget says. Fahey of the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) in The New York Times. However, the ESA is certainly not useless because many successes have been achieved in recent years. For example, 54 species that were originally on the list can be removed because they are now working fine again. This applies, for example, to the bald eagle, brown pelican and humpback whale. The status of 56 species was downgraded from “critically endangered” to “endangered”. In addition, FWS has worked with local governments, indigenous tribes, and private landowners to remove 60 species from the list.

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