Enola Holmes review: Millie Bobby Brown is a young heroine who inspires the next generation

Director: Harry Bradbear. Starring: Millie Bobby Brown, Henry Cavill, Sam Claflin, Adeel Akhtar, Fiona Shaw, Lewis Partridge, Susie Waukuma, Helena Bonham Carter. 12 testimonials, 123 minutes

Enola Holmes, Which is a direct adaptation of the YA book series Nancy Spring, attracted its own opponent – not Moriarty, but Arthur Conan Doyle’s property. It just wasn’t very good for the movie to portray Sherlock Holmes, brother here of the teenage protagonist (Millie Bobby Brown), as a fluffy man at times. As the lawsuit argues, the world-famous investigator only developed the capacity for emotion in his later stories, published between 1923 and 1927, and is still under copyright. Only psychopathic Sherlock genius is available to the public.

The accusation is more trivial than it sounds – Sherlock Enola HolmesPlayed with courage by Henry Cavill, he does not rage in the halls in a fit of tears. All he does is cuddle, surrounded in love as he lounges in front of trees and stares out of the windows. He is Mr. Darcy of the Victorian Collection.

It’s a well-suited choice for a scientist Enola Holmes. Enola herself is part of the Austin heroine, part of #Girlboss. Woman’s Book, filtered through a man’s script, then another man’s camera – written by Jack Thorne and directed by Harry Bradbear – led to a film filled with delightful, if inevitably superficial, declarations of female empowerment. In another reality, Warner Bros was going to release Enola Holmes in movie theaters, but the pandemic nullified these plans and the film was sold to Netflix. It’s suitable for both the big and the small screen – an adventure that’s easy to indulge in, yet humble in its ambitions.

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Enola grew up in happy independence, raised by her mother (Helena Bonham Carter) alone after the death of her father and the departure of her older siblings, Sherlock and Mycroft (Sam Claflin, sniffed here funny). The daily curriculum includes astrology, herbalism, beekeeping, and jujutsu. But on the morning of her 16th birthday, Enola wakes up to find her mother has disappeared, the only trace of her being a box of codes and decoders – the first step to solving the mystery of her disappearance. Sherlock is quietly sympathetic, but very interested in helping. Mycroft wants to pack it to finish school, so that it can indulge in the hustle and bustle of corsets and finally become “socially acceptable”.

Sherlock (Henry Cavill), Microft (Sam Claflin) and Inola (Millie Bobby Brown) make up the dysfunctional Holmes clan from Nancy Springer's books
Sherlock (Henry Cavill), Microft (Sam Claflin) and Inola (Millie Bobby Brown) make up the dysfunctional Holmes clan from Nancy Springer’s books(Alex Bailey / Legendary © 2020)

“You have to make some noise, if you want to be heard,” becomes the maternity advice that shapes Enola’s future. The character has a habit of presenting eloquent sides to the camera – a fourth wall-breaking technique openly borrowed from the Phoebe Waller-Bridge. FleabagDirected by Bradbear himself. And Brown, who is usually restricted to frowning and flipping cars on Netflix Weird things, You have to be smart, forthright, and confident – all the things a young heroine needs to inspire the next generation. But the Waller Bridge character looked into the lens at us, the audience, because she needed someone to do it, a bunch of conspirators into all of femininity’s most intimate secrets. Enola does this because she is a girl ahead of her time and we, future citizens, are the only ones who can truly understand her mind. She looks at us incredibly when someone mocks the concept of feminism or social equality. “Do you have any ideas?” Demanding when the case becomes particularly difficult. Enola Holmes Wires are crossed here, believing it could be a movie about heroic exceptionalism and the necessity of teamwork.

The film is set in the run-up to the People’s Representation Act of 1884, which expanded the voting scope to 60 percent of all men and laid the foundation for women’s right to vote. On her travels, Enola meets Lord Viscount Tewkesbury (Louis Partridge), who intends to vote on the bill in the House of Lords. I realized that, despite their differences, they shared a common goal. There are brief hints, too, to the more violent tactics of the women’s suffrage movement.

But its significance has never been explored. Enola Holmes He simply doesn’t pay attention to subtleties – not when her bright and intelligent hero looms large.

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