An exceptionally large, 400-year-old coral has been discovered in the Great Barrier Reef

An exceptionally large, 400-year-old coral has been discovered in the Great Barrier Reef

An exceptionally large, 400-year-old coral formation has been discovered in the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia. This was stated in an article published Thursday in the magazine “Scientific Reports”.

The coral, called Muga dhambi (large coral), was discovered in March on Goulbody – also known as Ophius Island – off the north coast of Queensland. According to the article, Muga Dambi is “buret’s coral”, the name of a genus of massive corals, with the largest diameter measured by scientists and the sixth highest measured coral in the Great Barrier Reef.

“Coral is hemispherical, 5.3 meters high and 10.4 meters wide, making it 2.4 meters wider than the second largest coral ever measured in the Great Barrier Reef,” said Adam Smith, director of Reef Ecologic at James Cook University. Based on calculations based on the growth rate of stony corals and annual sea surface temperature, we believe it is between 421 and 438 years. “It precedes European exploration and settlement in Australia,” Smith said in a statement issued today, Friday, by the University of Townsville in Queensland.

“The Burit are in good health, with 70 percent of live corals, despite having survived 80 major hurricanes, numerous coral bleaching events and centuries of exposure to invasive species, tides and human activity,” said Reef Ecological Chief. Contributing to the Scientific Reports article, Charlie Veron, a famous 17-year-old reef expert, has discovered more than 20 percent of the world’s coral species. The paper’s authors caution that increasing threats, such as the negative effects of climate change, may require restoration work to protect coral reefs such as Muga Dhambi.

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The coral, called Muga dhambi (large coral), was discovered in March on Goulbody – also known as Ophius Island – off the north coast of Queensland. According to the article, Muga Dambi is “buret’s coral”, the name of a genus of megacorals, with the largest diameter measured by scientists and the sixth longest measured coral in the Great Barrier Reef. “The hemispherical coral is 5.3 meters high and 10.4 meters wide, making it 2.4 meters wider than the second largest reef ever measured in the Great Barrier Reef,” said Adam Smith, director of Reef Ecological at James Cook University. Based on calculations based on To the growth rate of rocky coral reefs and annual sea surface temperature, we believe it to be between 421 and 438. “It precedes European exploration and settlement in Australia,” Smith said in a statement released Friday by the University of Townsville in Queensland. The Burrit tribe is in good health, with 70 percent live corals, although they have survived 80 major hurricanes, numerous coral bleaching events, and centuries of exposure to invasive species, tides, and human activity.” 17-year-old, in the Scientific Reports article, which discovered more than 20 percent of the world’s coral species.The paper’s authors warn that increasing threats, such as the negative effects of climate change, may require restoration work. To protect coral reefs like Muga Dhambi.

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